All Java Cafés are free, casual opportunities to discuss issues and events related to the United Nations and the world. We provide coffee, tea, cocoa, brief presentations and time for questions and conversation. Learn about upcoming Java Cafés here. We hope you will join us!

Java Café Global Conversation - February 18, 2020


UN SDG's IN ACTION!

"Developing a Sustainable World



through Socially and Environmentally Conscious Innovation"




Speaker: Manuel Laredo Garnica


SDG* Award-winning Manuel Laredo
Garnica
of Bolivia created a circular economy company that converts scrap tires into safe flooring for playgrounds and athletic fields in Bolivia, Paraguay, and Panama. His
 most recent award recognized his work toward *UN Sustainable Development Goals (inc SDG 11 Sustainable Cities.) Garnica is a UN SDG trainer, TED presenter, engineer, innovator and a 2019-20 Humphrey Fellow at MSU. 

Garnica founded Mamut, a socially- and environmentally-responsible urban company that develops sustainable cities. Mamut uses local resources to make locally-used products to further democratization.  He is a trainer of Sustainable Development Goals, having trained more than 2.000 young people to date. He is a social entrepreneur who has received a multitude of awards because of his innovative work that has improved the lives of many.  (see below: SDG #11 - Sustainable Cities and Communities)



        Tuesday, February 18, 2020

7 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. 

Refreshments and Networking 6:30 - 7 p.m.

East Lansing Public Library

950 Abbot Rd, East Lansing, MI 48823

Large Meeting Room

Overflow parking available at All Saints Church

800 Abbot Road, just south of the library.

Note: gate directly to the library from church parking lot. 

Goal 11: Make cities inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable

Cities are hubs for ideas, commerce, culture, science, productivity, social development and much more. At their best, cities have enabled people to advance socially and economically. With the number of people living within cities projected to rise to 5 billion people by 2030, it’s important that efficient urban planning and management practices are in place to deal with the challenges brought by urbanization.

Many challenges exist to maintaining cities in a way that continues to create jobs and prosperity without straining land and resources. Common urban challenges include congestion, lack of funds to provide basic services, a shortage of adequate housing, declining infrastructure and rising air pollution within cities.

Rapid urbanization challenges, such as the safe removal and management of solid waste within cities, can be overcome in ways that allow them to continue to thrive and grow, while improving resource use and reducing pollution and poverty. One such example is an increase in municipal waste collection. There needs to be a future in which cities provide opportunities for all, with access to basic services, energy, housing, transportation and more.

Why it matters: Sustainable Cities and Communities

Infographic: Sustainable Cities and Communities

  • Half of humanity – 3.5 billion people – lives in cities today and 5 billion people are projected to live in cities by 2030.
  • 95 per cent of urban expansion in the next decades will take place in developing world
  • 883 million people live in slums today and most them are found in Eastern and South-Eastern Asia.
  • The world’s cities occupy just 3 per cent of the Earth’s land, but account for 60-80 per cent of energy consumption and 75 per cent of carbon emissions.
  • Rapid urbanization is exerting pressure on fresh water supplies, sewage, the living environment, and public health
  • As of 2016, 90% of urban dwellers have been breathing unsafe air, resulting in 4.2 million deaths due to ambient air pollution. More than half of the global urban population were exposed to air pollution levels at least 2.5 times higher than the safety standard.

The United Nations Conference on Housing and Sustainable Urban Development, took place in Quito, Ecuador from 17-20 October 2016, and was the first UN global summit on urbanization since the adoption of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

Habitat III offered a unique opportunity to discuss the important challenges of how cities, towns, and village can be planned and managed, in order to fulfill their role as drivers of sustainable development, and how they can shape the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals and the Paris Agreement on climate change.

In Quito, world leaders adopted the New Urban Agenda which set global standards of achievement in sustainable urban development, rethinking the way we build, manage, and live in cities through drawing together cooperation with committed partners, relevant stakeholders, and urban actors at all levels of government as well as the civil society and private sector.

Upcoming Java Café Global Conversation dates: 

March 10

April 14

May 19



gluna@msu.edu

P.O. Box 1853
East Lansing, MI 48826

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